And man said, let there be God

May 7, 2007 at 12:10 am 16 comments

CreationGrowing up in church, it’s easy to assume that since the beginning of time, God, as defined by the Bible, existed. After all, Genesis 1:1 states that “In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.” The Bible then proceeds to document the history of humanity.

However, upon closer study, one would discover that this history of humanity is from the perspective of a small group of desert nomads and they referred to themselves, of course, as “God’s chosen people.” If you did not live within this very small region in the Middle East, you may has well have not existed. Furthermore, one would discover that the earliest books of the Bible were written sometime between 800 and 1500 years before Christ – hardly the definition of “in the beginning.” Even Christians who do not believe the earth to be millions of years old, can safely conclude that humans have existed for at least 10,000 years, possibly longer.

Did the earliest humans have a belief in God? If so, was he defined as he is in the Bible? In fact, one could ask was he even a he or was he a she? Female definitions of God pre-date the male definition due to the fact that it was a woman who gave birth to life.

As humans matured, they began to struggle with their origins, with their mortality, and with their purpose for being here. In this process, could God have been created to provide an answer to these questions? To believe that we will see our loved ones again does help us cope with the reality of death. To believe that we were created by God does answer the question of our origin. And to believe God has a purpose for our lives, does bring a certain security to our existence. In an age when there was no science, it’s easy to see how many questions a belief in God could answer.

Many religions hold to the belief that God created man but the reality is – man probably created God. Here’s my version of the Creation story.

- The de-Convert

Entry filed under: The de-Convert. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , .

Christianity: Believe first, answers will come Why I (a Christian) Admire Atheists

16 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Justin  |  May 7, 2007 at 12:51 am

    I think your reference to Genesis 1:1 is crucial and shouldnt be overlooked. Can we ever know for certain how creation came to be? Well, possibly. Sciences tells us that that no chain of causes is endless; a beginning exists. Is God the beginning? It’s likely.

    Great blog, keep it up.

    http://politicsandreligion.wordpress.com

  • 2. agnosticatheist  |  May 7, 2007 at 1:10 am

    Justin,

    As I mentioned in my last comment to an Emily (on another post), even if one proves there is a Creator, there’s no basis to assume that Elohim is this creator anymore than Allah, or Brahma, or Prometheus, or a host of other creators in religious texts.

    Proving a creator may be plausible but proving it’s Elohim-Yahweh-Jehovah is an entirely different challenge. It could just as easily be an alien.

    aA

  • 3. Brendan  |  May 7, 2007 at 9:18 am

    Of course there’s a Creator. ALL “things” and ALL change are created in language and thought. The Creator is the collective repository of the knowledge of “things” created in language and the relationship and order we give them to improve our ability to adapt or adapt to our surroundings. We are the Creator when we use the power of our divine logos.

    Genesis 1:1 does not represent creation ex nihilo as Christians imagine, but literally bringing shape to shapelessness or order out of chaos. For more:

    http://agnosticgnostic.blogspot.com/2007/03/death-of-chaos.html

  • 4. Mike C  |  May 7, 2007 at 9:47 am

    As humans matured, they began to struggle with their origins, with their mortality, and with their purpose for being here. In this process, could God have been created to provide an answer to these questions? To believe that we will see our loved ones again does help us cope with the reality of death. To believe that we were created by God does answer the question of our origin. And to believe God has a purpose for our lives, does bring a certain security to our existence. In an age when there was no science, it’s easy to see how many questions a belief in God could answer.

    What does science have to do with it? How does science add or take away anything from questions of mortality, origins or purpose? Even in an age of science these questions remain, and it doesn’t seem to me that science really adds much to the discussion. (E.g. we don’t need science to tell us that we all die; science is incapable of telling us what came before the Big Bang; and “purpose” is a question that is inherently non-scientific.)

  • 5. Mike C  |  May 7, 2007 at 9:50 am

    Elohim-Yahweh-Jehovah

    BTW, I don’t mean to be an annoying know-it-all, but listing “Yahweh” and “Jehovah” is a little redundant. You probably already know this, but it’s the same Hebrew word just transliterated differently.

  • 6. Justin  |  May 7, 2007 at 9:56 am

    hi aA,
    yes, you are right in saying that my evidence for a creator does not specifiy who that creator was – such a thing is impossible. I do not think aliens applies as then you would have to address the chain of causes that brought them about. Besides aliens exist inside time and reality which are attributes to applied to God.

    “Defining” who God is comes down to faith. I see the truth in Christianity because of Jesus (the most righteous ‘man’ ever to live) and the evidence surrounding His life and teachings.

  • 7. Justin  |  May 7, 2007 at 9:59 am

    *not applied to God (correction for the end of the first paragraph)

  • 8. layguy  |  May 7, 2007 at 10:02 am

    “In the beginning” does not have to mean that Moses was there. Just like historians don’t have to prove they were there about the subjects they write about. Your logic is flawed my friend.

  • 9. layguy  |  May 7, 2007 at 10:20 am

    Lol – your creation story made me laugh! I am away on a work trip in Sydney and am stuck in my hotel room and have enjoyed a bottle of wine – hence my spelling mistakes – please fix them for me AA.

    Your story reflects the pathetic things done by mankind under the “religion” banner and what you write about is true.

    A friend of mine who was a nuclear physicist and left his career to plant 1,000 churches in Asia once said to me, “God intended the Kingdom of God on earth. Man made it the church.”

  • 10. Brendan  |  May 7, 2007 at 10:27 am

    There is no “Beginning” without people to create it.

  • 11. arrgjonsmad  |  May 7, 2007 at 11:35 am

    Do you only question the Christian belief? or do you do this to all the other beliefs?

  • 12. Brendan  |  May 7, 2007 at 11:42 am

    All “beliefs” are constructs.

  • 13. PB and J  |  May 7, 2007 at 5:59 pm

    i think it is very easy to explain away the “authors” of the Bible if you try to label them as unthinking nomadic, desert wanderers. but unfortunately, this isnt really so. in fact, according to textual critics from without “christianity” the OT wasnt even written by Moses, but later. this means that the hebrews had already settled in canaan. they had begun to be an established nation.

    and certainly then as far as the NT goes, these men were raised in a hellenistic world. they were some wandering nomad.

    dont get me wrong, i am not trying to prove that the Bible is correct. but i think it is invalid to deny any validity based upon the nomadic argument.

    as a side note, socrates was a nomadic philosopher who wandered around talking to people and making disciples and he lived before Yeshua the Nazrene. but socrates is probably the greatest (or certainly one of them) philosopher of all time. his disciples’ works (plato) are incredible works. and his disciples’ disciple aristotle pretty much cleans up the rest. it has been said that between plato and aristotle there is nothing left to say. anyway, my point is that we tend to be pretty proud of our own sophistication and intellect, when there were many ancients who far surpassed most of us.

    peter

  • 14. gaki  |  May 8, 2007 at 1:39 am

    What I love is the assumption that the Old Testament was actually written 1500 to 500BC or so. No New Testament older than 400AD has been found. No Old Testament older than the Dead Sea Scrolls (roughly 150BC-50AD and mostly incomplete) has been found.

    As I’ve said to many of my Christian friends: a prophecy ain’t a prophecy until you have proof you said it BEFORE the events happened.

  • 15. PB and J  |  May 8, 2007 at 10:32 am

    gaki

    i am not sure if you were pting that out to me, but i think i was actually saying the opposite. i make no assumptions that it was written that long ago. however, your facts arent correct either. the dead sea scrolls are the oldest OT, but there are older fragments of the NT than 400. the oldest manuscript complete is 400, but not fragments.

    anyway, i wasnt trying to prove prophecy. i was pting out that it is a silly ad hominem attack to put the Bible down because it was written by “wandering desert nomads”.

    shalom
    peter

  • 16. Fritz M. Amtsberg  |  June 3, 2007 at 11:12 pm

    My take on the existence of god is this. Christians sys that god is an infinitely perfect being who made all things and keeps them in existence. Other religions have their definitions. The fact that “There Is” implies that something “Always Was”. So “Always Was” can be defined as “god”.

    The fact that mankind has killed “non believers” of there faiths since they found out how to kill leads me to believe that “Always Was” ain’t to interested in what goes on on earth. I believe that this shows the maturity of “Always Was” not to be involved in mans inability to live with man without making up a definition of god and killing non-believers of their definition of god in the process.

    Seems like radical religion is a cyclic behavior of man and as we grow technically the results become more catastrophic.

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Attention Christian Readers

Just in case you were wondering who we are and why we de-converted.

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Whether or not you believe in God, you should live your life with love, kindness, compassion, mercy and tolerance while trying to make the world a better place. If there is no God, you have lost nothing and will have made a positive impact on those around you. If there is a benevolent God reviewing your life, you will be judged on your actions and not just on your ability to blindly believe in creeds- when there is a significant lack of evidence on how to define God or if he/she even exists.

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