Jesus and Politics

December 18, 2007 at 11:59 pm 26 comments


Thoughts????

Entry filed under: The de-Convert. Tags: , , , .

Challenging Religious Myths 2: Atheism is just another Religion Coming Home for Christmas (after de-conversion)

26 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Jersey  |  December 19, 2007 at 12:57 am

    I’ve seen tons of commentary all over the internet so far ranging from evangelicals awarding him for bring back “Christmas” to extreme critiques on how he finally went over the line in his test “to prove his Christian faith”.

  • 2. karen  |  December 19, 2007 at 1:53 am

    Hoo boy, talk about your pandering! I can only hope that even if this does win him votes in the “heartland” it will totally backfire when he gets to some of the less-sanctimonious states.

    The last thing we need is this country is another “pastor in chief.”

  • 3. Thinking Ape  |  December 19, 2007 at 3:12 am

    You know, as a Canadian I find this religious pandering hilarious. Well, I find the whole American political system quite funny (including the “I’m Mike Huckabee, and I approve this message… for myself” requirement at the end of every political ad). I know our system up north is far from perfect, but could any Canadian reader of this blog actually remember the last time a Canadian politician, even a Progressive Conservative/Reform/Canadian Alliance/Conservative one, used Christmas and the “birth of Jeezus” as a campaign ploy? Awesome.

    In fearing for my American peers, I fear for the world. I wonder if we will look on in longing for the “Dubya Years” once President Giuliani/Huckabee/Romney/Thomson is sworn in. If Republicans win this next Presidential election, I think I might go hide in a mountain somewhere in Nunavut.

  • 4. strawdog  |  December 19, 2007 at 5:10 am

    Well, since Huckabee’s God apparently remote-controls people into voting for him, I think it’s obvious who Jesus would vote for! ;)

  • 5. strawdog  |  December 19, 2007 at 5:10 am

    >In fearing for my American peers, I fear for the world. I wonder if we will look on in longing for the “Dubya Years” once President Giuliani/Huckabee/Romney/Thomson is sworn in. If Republicans win this next Presidential election, I think I might go hide in a mountain somewhere in Nunavut.

    Correct! That would get SCARY indeed!!

  • 6. Jason  |  December 19, 2007 at 7:14 am

    In an attempt to keep politics out of Christmas, he does exactly that: brings politics into Christmas…whatever…

  • 7. locomotivebreath1901  |  December 19, 2007 at 9:04 am

    Huck, schmuck.

    Geez.

    What a shrill & hyper -sensitive society we’ve become. We’ve got aggressive islamists seeking to dhimmi-fy us into submission; if not out right kill us, and folks are gnashing their teeth and tearing their hair over some politico wishing folks ‘merry christmas’!

    The reality is that people are spiritual animals. Human history presents solid evidence for this fact. Wishing it away doesn’t make it so. Life doesn’t happen in a vacuum. Spiritual or otherwise. It’s time to choose….because the islamists won’t let you.

    Merry Christmas! God bless us.

    Everyone.

  • 8. amy  |  December 19, 2007 at 9:42 am

    “…what really matters is the celebration of the birth of Christ.”

    ????

    That’s what really matters? A birthday celebration for God (for those who believe he’s God)? That’s what really matters — not helping homeless people who are freezing their asses off, or helping people dying of AIDS, or feeding the hungry? I may not have a right to say this since I don’t consider myself a Christian anymore, only an admirer of Christ, but, is this really the message Jesus would want to send?

    Maybe doing those things is what he meant by “celebration.” But he didn’t specify, so for all I know, “celebration” meant having parties and stuff. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy Christmas, because even though I don’t believe Jesus was God, he strikes me as a pretty cool guy, like Gandhi or Buddha, so I have no problem with people wanting to celebrate his birthday. But to say it’s what really matters, I don’t know. That bothers me.

    This reminds me of a Tide commercial I saw last night. Buy a t-shirt that says “Tide” on it and Tide will wash clothes for victims of the California fires. I think it’s great that Tide is doing something to help. Everyone should have clean laundry — nothing like clothes fresh out of the dryer — but surely the corporation that owns Tide could do it without tying it to a clever marketing scheme. Surely they make a little money. Have you seen how expensive Tide is?

    I’m such a cynic.

  • 9. rebecca shannon  |  December 19, 2007 at 9:43 am

    Rebecca checks for teeth…no gnashing here. Wait, my hair?! Oh good, still there!

  • 10. WhoreChurch  |  December 19, 2007 at 9:47 am

    This sets up the perfect Huckleberry reverse attack from any other candidate who criticizes the ad:

    “What? Now a candidate can’t even wish a ‘Merry Christmas’ without being criticized? Have we become that intolerant of Christianity? And now my critics are seeing crosses in bookcases and criticizing me for that as well.”

    This ad was a beautiful piece of political propaganda that will be left virtually untouched by the other candidates. It reminds me of the days after 9/11 when to question the President or Patriot Act was public suicide.

  • 11. pistolpete  |  December 19, 2007 at 10:10 am

    I really don’t see what the big fuss is. Huckabee is a Baptist preacher running for President. He is who he is, right and wrong. He has been given a platform to proclaim something about his faith and he’s used it. Will it gaiin him a few votes? Maybe, but I doubt it. Religious conservatives will still vote for him and more secular conservatives and liberals won’t. What’s the big deal?

  • 12. Rebecca  |  December 19, 2007 at 10:10 am

    As it seems to be a political move, it’s as if he’s cheapening his religion and personal faith.

    Like the “If you love Jesus then you’ll forward this email to 12 of your friends in the next ten minutes” email that used to appear in my inbox intermittenly. I sent it back telling them that if they thought that God gave a shit about a pathetic chain email, or if they thought it had any bearing on their afterlife then they were complete idiots. And by broadcasting their faith in this way they were making themselves and other Christians look like morons.

    Little bit of a tangent but not really.

  • 13. LeoPardus  |  December 19, 2007 at 12:38 pm

    Yeah. It is a bit silly. And it is political. Why not just come on and say, “From the Huckabee family to all of you; Merry Christmas.”? No mention of politics. No “Huckabee for President” anywhere on the screen. No “I approve this message.”

    But even if he’d done that, he’d catch crap for it. It’s a lovely situation when you have to try to figure out how to say, “Merry Christmas”, without pissing people off.

    Have y’all seen WalMart agonizing over what to have their employees say for the season? I think they settled on “Happy Holidays”. I have a slightly perverse desire to go to a WalMart, wait for them to give me their silly greeting and explode all over them with either,
    “Holiday?! Do you know what that word means? Holy day! What’s holy about it? Damn you for bringing religion into it again!” OR
    “It’s bloody ‘Christmas’ you politically correct buttwipe! Call the g-d holiday what it is! You’re really pissing me off!”

    In either case I’d promise to write the corporation, the news media, and my congressman to protest their boorish, insensitive stupidity.

  • 14. WhoreChurch  |  December 19, 2007 at 12:43 pm

    Who paid for the ad? My guess his political fund. This was an obvious attempt to garner favor from evangelical voters. Anyone who can’t see that probably has never written copy.

    We humans are a pretty easy bunch of folks to snooker.

  • 15. BEn  |  December 19, 2007 at 12:53 pm

    Wait…isn’t it most likely that Jesus was born sometime in mid- to late-September?

    I wonder if Jesus gave Huckabee that ChristMAS sweater…

  • 16. the chaplain  |  December 19, 2007 at 1:28 pm

    #14: Who paid for this ad?

    At the end of the ad is the obligatory announcement that the ad was paid for by “Huckabee for President, Inc.” You can get information about their finances, which was filed with the Federal Elections Commissions

    I’m really tired of candidates who want to use their religions to gain votes, but then cry “foul” if they are asked about a) the substance of their beliefs, or b) how their beliefs will influence their policies. If they want to gain votes from their religions, then voters have a right to examine those religions. We cannot let them have their cake and eat it too.

  • 17. the chaplain  |  December 19, 2007 at 1:30 pm

    Aw, man! Sorry about the blown link in the previous comment! I didn’t close my tag properly. If you cut and past this link (I’ve just tested it again), you should get to Huckabee’s financial statement.

    http://query.nictusa.com/pres/2007/Q3/C00431809.html

  • 18. bry0000000  |  December 19, 2007 at 6:56 pm

    locomotivebreath1901 said…

    “What a shrill & hyper -sensitive society we’ve become. We’ve got aggressive islamists seeking to dhimmi-fy us into submission; if not out right kill us, and folks are gnashing their teeth and tearing their hair over some politico wishing folks ‘merry christmas’!”

    I guess being analytical of politicians, by attempting to decipher subliminal messages in order to keep ourselves informed and honest, makes us shrill and hyper-sensitive. And I’d much rather be shrill and hyper-sensitive than ignorant and apathetic.

    locomotivebreath1901 said…

    “The reality is that people are spiritual animals. Human history presents solid evidence for this fact. Wishing it away doesn’t make it so. Life doesn’t happen in a vacuum. Spiritual or otherwise. It’s time to choose….because the islamists won’t let you.”

    I’d disagree with that. Instead, I’d like to echo something that FireShadow brought to light in her blog: we are not a spiritual animal so much as an animal that has a desire for absolutes. Religion provides those absolutes, and unfortunately, has the privilege of bypassing reason using an omnipotent as a catalyst.

    And just as a heads up: when you group every practitioner of Islam into a radical sect, you come off as an uninformed pundit who sees logic and reason as barriers to desirable conclusions. And I have a hunch that that’s not how you truly feel.

    Happy Holidays!

  • 19. HeIsSailing  |  December 19, 2007 at 11:40 pm

    Is this ad considered controversial? If it is, that says something truly sad about us non-Christians. Call me the odd one out here, but this is one non-Christian who loves listening to Handel’s ‘Messiah’, singing religious carols, admiring traditional nativity scenes and wishing my neighbors ‘Merry Christmas’ during the Holiday season. The majority of my neighbors view this as a time to celebrate their faith in Christ – what should I care? I can use the same time to celebrate life, my family and loved ones in my own way.

    Seriously, what is the controversy?

    On the same token, I agree with The Chaplain regarding the public scrutinizing the politician’s faiths. If they feel free to proclaim it from the stump, we should feel free to question them on it, especially where it will affect policy.

  • 20. Tina B  |  December 20, 2007 at 8:45 am

    The last thing we need is this country is another “pastor in chief.”

    Ditto!!

  • 21. LeoPardus  |  December 20, 2007 at 12:27 pm

    HIS:

    I’m completely with you on loving the music. And I love the beauty of religious art (esp. around an EO church). And i love the whole season.

    For my part the only controversy on this ad is that he starts off talking about “don’t you hate all those political ads”, then tries to do a “just enjoy the holiday” bit, and ends up with a political ad. Kind of silly IMO.

  • 22. vjack  |  December 20, 2007 at 4:37 pm

    As an atheist, it is fairly clear that I have no place in the Huckster’s America.

  • 23. karen  |  December 20, 2007 at 5:18 pm

    To me, it’s the cross-shaped light in the background and the mention of “celebrating Christ at Christmas” that just seemed like he’s using Christmas to do some very blatant pandering to that narrow slice of Iowa voters that he needs to put him over the top.

    I have no objection to a Christmas message from a political candidate, though I’m likely to view it rather cynically no matter which candidate it comes from. ;-)

    As far as Christmas itself, I happily celebrate with family and friends, my house is decorated and I’m planning a huge feast for Monday evening. The only difference from this year and my religious years is that we won’t be dragging ourselves (exhausted) to Christmas Eve service this year.

    That was my favorite service of the year, however. An 11 p.m. start time, with candlelight, carols, a beautifully decorated sanctuary and a lot more “specialness” than most fundy Protestant services.

  • 24. LaShawn  |  December 27, 2007 at 9:57 am

    Have y’all seen WalMart agonizing over what to have their employees say for the season? I think they settled on “Happy Holidays”. I have a slightly perverse desire to go to a WalMart, wait for them to give me their silly greeting and explode all over them

    Please don’t :( I work at Wal-Mart and you won’t believe how much crap we go through everyday with customers. The place is a zoo.

  • 25. Rob  |  December 30, 2007 at 5:25 am

    It is an underhanded move, a means to project an image off of someone’s idea of ‘family values’ and Christian faith. It creates the illusion that he’s actually speaking from a personal standpoint. But, it’s just messaging, even if Huckabee is a Christian. But, it’s to be expected, I guess. There’s a lot of money to be made in pandering to the Christian Right by means of taking the Lord’s name in vain.

    Hey. Isn’t that blasphemy?

  • 26. James  |  December 31, 2007 at 7:54 am

    To the person who cares little about Jesus and the whole meaning of the event we call “CHRISTmas,” I understand how you can find fault with this ad but none with the spewing of dummercrat lies. If Hillary or Obama says something about relgion (and that’s all it is), all we hear out of you is goos and ahhhs. By the way religion is a ritual and righteousness is the way, and few there will be that go therin, so I understand that we won’t always be a majority, but in the end ~ we win!
    I truly feel sorry for people who are bent on defeat. If you win the election, all you have won is defeat. Go figure?

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